Https www edd ca gov unemployment eligibility htm


https www edd ca gov unemployment eligibility htm

disability begins - Additional eligibility [details](https://edd.ca.gov/Disability/Am_I_Eligible_for_DI_Benefits.htm) # **How to Apply:** - File a DI. IN CALIFORNIA · Unemployment Insurance Eligibility Requirements https://edd.ca.gov/Unemployment/Eligibility.htm · For faster and more convenient access to those. Go to https://askedd.edd.ca.gov. Select Category: Unemployment Insurance Benefits Select Sub-Category: Payments Select a Topic: Where is my payment?

Https www edd ca gov unemployment eligibility htm -

Do I qualify for Unemployment Insurance?

Tenant and Rental Housing Preservation Advice:

Bay Area Legal Aid or call their advice line at (800) 551-5554.

Avoiding Home Foreclosures:

http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/ or call 800-225-5342.

Healthcare for the Uninsured or Unemployed:

Medi-Cal: California’s Medicaid Program, call (800) 952-5253 or see www.medi-cal.ca.gov.

For information on the U.S. Medicare program for people over age 65 or with disabilities, see www.medicare.gov. For public and private health care options: www.coverageforall.org or call (800) 234-1317.

Credit Counseling/Bankruptcy Advice:

For a complete list of Consumer Credit Counseling Service non-profit organizations, see National Foundation for Credit Counseling’s website or call (800) 388-2227. For Spanish speakers: (800) 682-9832.

Also the Department of Justice has an approved list of credit counselors online at www.usdoj.gov/ust/eo/bapcpa/ccde/cc_approved.htm

Subsidized or Supplemental Income for Individuals with Disabilities:

See www.ssa.gov/ssi/ or call 1-800-772-1213. For early retirement due to disability, see http://www.ssa.gov/dibplan/index.htm.

Help with Paying PG∓E and Utility Bills:

PG&E’s California Alternative Energy Rates (CARE) program: For more information see www.pge.com/care/; call 1-866-743-2273; or email: CAREandFERA [at] pge.com

Relief for Energy Assistance through Community Help (REACH), sponsored by PG&E, offers one-time help and is facilitated by the Salvation Army. To apply for REACH assistance in your area, contact the Salvation Army at 1 (800) 933-9677.

Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program: LIHEAP is a federally funded assistance program administered by the California Department of Community Services and Development (CSD). LIHEAP offers one-time assistance. Appointed community-based agencies process LIHEAP applications. To find the agency in your area, call 1-866-675-6623, or see http://www.csd.ca.gov/Programs/Energy%20Service%20Providers.aspx.

Loan Deferments:

Some loans, such as educational loans, qualify for Economic Hardship or Unemployment Deferments. A deferment can only apply if your loans are in repayment and in good standing. Contact your lender for more information.

Источник: https://legalaidatwork.org/factsheet/lost-your-job-your-rights-and-benefits/

Disaster Unemployment Assistance: How Workers Can Access the Program After the California Wildfires in Butte, Los Angeles, and Ventura Counties

November 15, 2018

Updated December 15, 2018

What Is Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA)?

Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA), also referred to as Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance, is a federal program that provides temporary financial assistance to individuals unemployed as a result of a “major disaster” declared by the president.

On November 12, 2018, a major disaster was declared for parts of California due to the Camp Fire in Butte County, the Hill Fire in Ventura County, and the Woolsey Fire in Los Angeles County and Ventura County. As of November 14, DUA benefits are available to workers in those counties who are displaced from employment due to the wildfires and who do not qualify for regular state Unemployment Insurance (UI). The deadline for filing DUA applications in the three disaster-designated counties (originally December 14, 2018) is now extended to March 15, 2019.

Due to the wildfire disasters, California has waived the normal one-week waiting period for those claiming state UI benefits during the disaster period in Butte, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties and in several other counties covered by declared state fire emergencies.  As a result, UI and DUA benefits can be paid beginning the week of November 11, 2018, for weeks during the disaster period in which a worker is wholly or partially unemployed as a result of the disaster.

Camp Fire California Federal Disaster Counties:  Butte

Hill and Woolsey Fires California Federal Disaster Counties:  Los Angeles, Ventura

For a current list of federally-declared disasters and emergencies, see FEMA’s website (http://www.fema.gov/disasters).

What Are the Basic Eligibility Requirements for DUA?

There are two major requirements for an individual to qualify for DUA: 1) The individual must be out of work as a “direct result” of a major disaster; and 2) The individual does not qualify for regular unemployment insurance (UI) from any state. Once found to be eligible for DUA, workers must actively look for work and accept suitable work offered them, not unlike UI recipients. In addition, the individual must show that for every week he or she is collecting DUA, his or her unemployment continues to be the direct result of the disaster, not other factors.

How Much Are DUA Benefit Payments?

Like UI benefits, DUA benefits are paid weekly, once an application is completed, filed and processed. DUA recipients receive the same weekly benefits that they would have been entitled to had they qualified for UI in the state where they were employed. However, at a minimum, DUA benefits cannot be less than one-half of the state’s average weekly UI benefits. In California, the average weekly UI benefit is $326.70, the minimum weekly DUA benefit is $164, and the maximum weekly benefit for DUA and UI is $450 (see the state maximum and minimum DUA benefit levels below).

The DUA benefits for part-time workers are pro-rated based on the hours they worked as a percent of a 40-hour work week. Note that DUA benefits are reduced by any other wage-loss compensation, including private insurance, Supplemental Unemployment Benefits, worker’s compensation, and a pro-rated amount of a retirement pension or annuity.

California$164 Minimum Weekly DUA Benefit/$450 Maximum

 

How Long Will an Individual’s DUA Benefits Last?

The maximum duration of DUA benefits is 26 weeks. However, an individual’s benefits cannot extend beyond the period when the disaster officially ends, which is six months from the date the federal disaster was declared. In the case of California, that means the DUA benefits cannot extend beyond May 2019 (unless the deadline is extended by Congress). In addition, the DUA benefits cannot extend beyond when the recipient returns to work or self-employment or beyond the period when the individual’s unemployment is no longer directly related to the disaster.

What Are Some Major Examples of Individuals Who Can Collect DUA?

Those who may be eligible for DUA and typically could not collect regular state UI benefits include:

  • Self-employed people who lost their business or suffered a substantial interruption of activities as a direct result of a major disaster;
  • Workers whose place of employment was damaged due to the disaster and work is not available;
  • Workers who cannot reach their employment as a result of the disaster;
  • Workers unemployed as a result of an injury caused as a direct result of the disaster;
  • People who are scheduled to start work but became unemployed because they no longer have a job as a direct result of a disaster.

Are Workers Who Did Not Work in the Disaster Area Also Eligible for DUA if Their Unemployment Was Still Directly Caused by the Disaster?

There are limited situations where workers outside the disaster area can qualify for DUA if they were laid off due to their employer’s loss of substantial revenue from contracts with businesses located in the disaster area. However, according to the federal regulations, the employer or self-employed individual must have received at least a “majority of its revenue or income from an entity that was either damaged or destroyed in the disaster.” In addition, the individual must continually establish that his or her unemployment remains directly related to the major disaster.

What Are the Deadlines to Apply for DUA?

To qualify for DUA, individuals must normally apply no later than 30 days after the availability of DUA was officially announced by the state. As of December 14, 2018, the deadline for DUA applications from workers in Butte, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties is extended to March 15, 2019. Late applications can be accepted, but only if “good cause” is shown for the late filing. However, under no circumstances can DUA applications be accepted after the disaster period ends.

What Information Is Necessary to Verify an Applicant’s Work and Earnings?

The DUA application requires proof of employment and earnings, as well as a Social Security Number. The proof of employment is due no later than 21 days after the application is filed with the state. For self-employed applicants, copies of tax returns are required as proof of income and self-employment. If verification of employment or other documents requested as part of the DUA application are not available, a sworn statement including other forms of verification can be submitted. Interim DUA payments can take place while the necessary documentation is gathered. However, the failure to submit the required documentation on time may result in a benefit overpayment which can later be recovered from the individual by the state. (In special circumstances, the U.S. Department of Labor has extended the 21-day deadline to provide the necessary employment and earnings information.)

Where Can an Individual Apply for DUA?

Each state may process DUA somewhat differently. Most states will process applications by telephone, as part of their automated claims-taking process for regular state UI benefits, and online via the Internet. For the latest information on how to file for DUA as a result of the California Wildfires disaster, we recommend that individuals regularly check the California unemployment insurance agency website listed below.

The California Employment Development Department (EDD), the state agency that administers the DUA and UI programs, encourages applicants who can do so to file claims online at: https://www.edd.ca.gov/unemployment/UI_Online.htm

Claims may also be filed by telephone Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 noon, with the following phone lines available in these languages:

  • English: 1-800-300-5616
  • Spanish: 1-800-326-8937
  • Chinese (Cantonese): 1-800-547-3506
  • Chinese (Mandarin): 1-866-303-0706
  • Vietnamese: 1-800-547-2058

Are Agricultural Workers Eligible for State Unemployment Benefits?

Yes, farmworkers are fully eligible for state unemployment benefits in California.  If a farmworker does not qualify for state unemployment insurance (UI) benefits due to failing to meet the state UI earnings requirement, the farmworker may qualify for Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA), if he or she was not employed on a small farm.

Are Immigrant Workers Eligible for State Unemployment Benefits and Federally-Funded Disaster Unemployment Assistance?

Generally, workers who have work authorization both at the time that they were working and while they collect benefits may qualify for regular state unemployment benefits and DUA.

Individuals who are not U.S. citizens must present documentation supporting their immigration status, and the State UI agency must verify their status through a government process called Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlement Program (SAVE), administered by US Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS).

What Additional Services and Resources Are Available to Workers and Families Impacted by the California Wildfires?

In addition to DUA, the federal government is funding a range of services for workers and families impacted by the November 2018 California Wildfires disaster.

The National Employment Law Project is a non-profit organization that advocates for unemployed workers.  The information provided with this fact sheet is based on the best resources we have available on the DUA program.  However, it should not be relied upon as source of official government information on the DUA program.

Updated December 15, 2018

What Is Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA)?

Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA), also referred to as Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance, is a federal program that provides temporary financial assistance to individuals unemployed as a result of a “major disaster” declared by the president.

On November 12, 2018, a major disaster was declared for parts of California due to the Camp Fire in Butte County, the Hill Fire in Ventura County, and the Woolsey Fire in Los Angeles County and Ventura County. As of November 14, DUA benefits are available to workers in those counties who are displaced from employment due to the wildfires and who do not qualify for regular state Unemployment Insurance (UI). The deadline for filing DUA applications in the three disaster-designated counties (originally December 14, 2018) is now extended to March 15, 2019.

Due to the wildfire disasters, California has waived the normal one-week waiting period for those claiming state UI benefits during the disaster period in Butte, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties and in several other counties covered by declared state fire emergencies.  As a result, UI and DUA benefits can be paid beginning the week of November 11, 2018, for weeks during the disaster period in which a worker is wholly or partially unemployed as a result of the disaster.

Camp Fire California Federal Disaster Counties:  Butte

Hill and Woolsey Fires California Federal Disaster Counties:  Los Angeles, Ventura

For a current list of federally-declared disasters and emergencies, see FEMA’s website (http://www.fema.gov/disasters).

What Are the Basic Eligibility Requirements for DUA?

There are two major requirements for an individual to qualify for DUA: 1) The individual must be out of work as a “direct result” of a major disaster; and 2) The individual does not qualify for regular unemployment insurance (UI) from any state. Once found to be eligible for DUA, workers must actively look for work and accept suitable work offered them, not unlike UI recipients. In addition, the individual must show that for every week he or she is collecting DUA, his or her unemployment continues to be the direct result of the disaster, not other factors.

How Much Are DUA Benefit Payments?

Like UI benefits, DUA benefits are paid weekly, once an application is completed, filed and processed. DUA recipients receive the same weekly benefits that they would have been entitled to had they qualified for UI in the state where they were employed. However, at a minimum, DUA benefits cannot be less than one-half of the state’s average weekly UI benefits. In California, the average weekly UI benefit is $326.70, the minimum weekly DUA benefit is $164, and the maximum weekly benefit for DUA and UI is $450 (see the state maximum and minimum DUA benefit levels below).

The DUA benefits for part-time workers are pro-rated based on the hours they worked as a percent of a 40-hour work week. Note that DUA benefits are reduced by any other wage-loss compensation, including private insurance, Supplemental Unemployment Benefits, worker’s compensation, and a pro-rated amount of a retirement pension or annuity.

California$164 Minimum Weekly DUA Benefit/$450 Maximum

 

How Long Will an Individual’s DUA Benefits Last?

The maximum duration of DUA benefits is 26 weeks. However, an individual’s benefits cannot extend beyond the period when the disaster officially ends, which is six months from the date the federal disaster was declared. In the case of California, that means the DUA benefits cannot extend beyond May 2019 (unless the deadline is extended by Congress). In addition, the DUA benefits cannot extend beyond when the recipient returns to work or self-employment or beyond the period when the individual’s unemployment is no longer directly related to the disaster.

What Are Some Major Examples of Individuals Who Can Collect DUA?

Those who may be eligible for DUA and typically could not collect regular state UI benefits include:

  • Self-employed people who lost their business or suffered a substantial interruption of activities as a direct result of a major disaster;
  • Workers whose place of employment was damaged due to the disaster and work is not available;
  • Workers who cannot reach their employment as a result of the disaster;
  • Workers unemployed as a result of an injury caused as a direct result of the disaster;
  • People who are scheduled to start work but became unemployed because they no longer have a job as a direct result of a disaster.

Are Workers Who Did Not Work in the Disaster Area Also Eligible for DUA if Their Unemployment Was Still Directly Caused by the Disaster?

There are limited situations where workers outside the disaster area can qualify for DUA if they were laid off due to their employer’s loss of substantial revenue from contracts with businesses located in the disaster area. However, according to the federal regulations, the employer or self-employed individual must have received at least a “majority of its revenue or income from an entity that was either damaged or destroyed in the disaster.” In addition, the individual must continually establish that his or her unemployment remains directly related to the major disaster.

What Are the Deadlines to Apply for DUA?

To qualify for DUA, individuals must normally apply no later than 30 days after the availability of DUA was officially announced by the state. As of December 14, 2018, the deadline for DUA applications from workers in Butte, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties is extended to March 15, 2019. Late applications can be accepted, but only if “good cause” is shown for the late filing. However, under no circumstances can DUA applications be accepted after the disaster period ends.

What Information Is Necessary to Verify an Applicant’s Work and Earnings?

The DUA application requires proof of employment and earnings, as well as a Social Security Number. The proof of employment is due no later than 21 days after the application is filed with the state. For self-employed applicants, copies of tax returns are required as proof of income and self-employment. If verification of employment or other documents requested as part of the DUA application are not available, a sworn statement including other forms of verification can be submitted. Interim DUA payments can take place while the necessary documentation is gathered. However, the failure to submit the required documentation on time may result in a benefit overpayment which can later be recovered from the individual by the state. (In special circumstances, the U.S. Department of Labor has extended the 21-day deadline to provide the necessary employment and earnings information.)

Where Can an Individual Apply for DUA?

Each state may process DUA somewhat differently. Most states will process applications by telephone, as part of their automated claims-taking process for regular state UI benefits, and online via the Internet. For the latest information on how to file for DUA as a result of the California Wildfires disaster, we recommend that individuals regularly check the California unemployment insurance agency website listed below.

The California Employment Development Department (EDD), the state agency that administers the DUA and UI programs, encourages applicants who can do so to file claims online at: https://www.edd.ca.gov/unemployment/UI_Online.htm

Claims may also be filed by telephone Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 noon, with the following phone lines available in these languages:

  • English: 1-800-300-5616
  • Spanish: 1-800-326-8937
  • Chinese (Cantonese): 1-800-547-3506
  • Chinese (Mandarin): 1-866-303-0706
  • Vietnamese: 1-800-547-2058

Are Agricultural Workers Eligible for State Unemployment Benefits?

Yes, farmworkers are fully eligible for state unemployment benefits in California.  If a farmworker does not qualify for state unemployment insurance (UI) benefits due to failing to meet the state UI earnings requirement, the farmworker may qualify for Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA), if he or she was not employed on a small farm.

Are Immigrant Workers Eligible for State Unemployment Benefits and Federally-Funded Disaster Unemployment Assistance?

Generally, workers who have work authorization both at the time that they were working and while they collect benefits may qualify for regular state unemployment benefits and DUA.

Individuals who are not U.S. citizens must present documentation supporting their immigration status, and the State UI agency must verify their status through a government process called Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlement Program (SAVE), administered by US Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS).

What Additional Services and Resources Are Available to Workers and Families Impacted by the California Wildfires?

In addition to DUA, the federal government is funding a range of services for workers and families impacted by the November 2018 California Wildfires disaster.

The National Employment Law Project is a non-profit organization that advocates for unemployed workers.  The information provided with this fact sheet is based on the best resources we have available on the DUA program.  However, it should not be relied upon as source of official government information on the DUA program.

Back to Top of Page
Источник: https://www.nelp.org/publication/disaster-unemployment-assistance-workers-can-access-program-california-wildfires-butte-los-angeles-ventura-counties/

Some San Diegans can earn more on unemployment. Why go back to work?

Like many San Diegans, Sherif Halawani found out he would be out of work for a while in mid-March.

The 37-year-old was laid off from his job as a server at The Melting Pot in downtown San Diego as fear about COVID-19 spread across the nation. Since it was few days before Gov. Gavin Newsom’s stay-at-home order, he was able to easily apply for unemployment before thousands of others overwhelmed the system.

About two weeks later, the federal CARES Act was passed, which gave Halawani and other unemployed Americans an extra $600 a week. He said he heard about it from the news but it was still a shock when he saw his bank account. “I couldn’t believe it. They actually gave me that,” he said.

Halawani was in for another surprise. He now gets $250 more a week than if he was actually working.

Across the United States, many unemployed workers are finding out the same thing. The enhanced federal jobless benefit — when combined with state unemployment insurance — delivers more income to some laid-off workers than they earned when employed.

While normal unemployment benefits pay less than typical wages, creating an incentive for workers to look for a job, the additional stimulus benefit could have the opposite effect, particularly when coupled with possible health concerns around the coronavirus.

The extra weekly $600 runs out at the end of July, but it is still a concern for some businesses looking to reopen in the next three months.

It could get even tougher for small businesses to lure back employees later in the year. U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich, and U.S. Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., introduced companion bills on Friday that would extend the $600 per week Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation payments through the end of 2020.

It isn’t a universal situation, with many workers still struggling to get approved for unemployment benefits. A tsunami of claims since the coronavirus shutdown has overwhelmed California’s Employment Development Department’s jobless benefits call center and online portal, leading to long delays on hold and website crashes.

But the Union-Tribune spoke with many workers, who declined to be named in this article out of fear it would hurt future job chances and who are earning more on unemployment. They all expressed concern about finding a jobafter federal benefits ended, even though their financial stress was lessened at the moment.

Halawani said even though he knows he could earn more collecting unemployment, he would go back to The Melting Pot if it reopens because the company has treated him very well. He said he has not been looking for another job, doubtful there are a lot of openings and is using the extra money to invest in the stock market.

However, the co-owner of the 71-room Ocean Park Inn in Pacific Beach found out some workers did not want to return after he received a much-desired small-business loan that would cover his payroll. Elvin Lai said so far two workers out of his 24-person staff told him they wouldn’t come back. He is still waiting to hear from others on his staff.

“They said, ‘Why do I need to take the risk if I can make more sitting at home?’” he said.

Lai said he thought their point was valid, and didn’t seem overly upset about it. Meanwhile, he has delayed reopening his hotel — even with the Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP, loan — because he still isn’t clear on guidelines for reopening.

Legally, workers who decline to return when their employer calls them could potentially forfeit unemployment benefits, said San Diego unemployment attorney Warren Beck. He said unemployment is a bit like taxes, where it is reasonable to assume the Internal Revenue Service doesn’t double-check every filing, but if you get caught it is big trouble.

Individuals who turn down their previous jobs and continue to collect benefits could be forced to pay back all of the money, as well as incur a 30 percent penalty and face limitations on filing for unemployment again for a period of time, Beck said.

“Perjury is a crime in the state of California,” Beck said. “You don’t get a choice. You don’t say, “Gee, I could stay home and make more money, so why should I go back to work?’”

And the California Employment Development Department can find out fairly easily who is collecting benefits illegally, Beck said. Employers are supposed to submit a form alerting the EDD when a worker is called back but declines the job.

He said he has received more calls about unemployment insurance in the last two weeks than he could recall in 38 years of practice.

Local businesses prepare to rehire

The enhanced benefits have sparked concern among some local businesses over whether they’ll be competing with unemployment insurance as they try to bring back workers.

The topic takes on particular urgency for companies that have recently received PPP loans. Under the guidelines, the loans will be completely forgiven if businesses spend 75 percent of the money on payroll within eight weeks of funding, as well as hire enough workers to reach pre-COVID-19 employment levels.

“This whole PPP and unemployment thing, I don’t know,” said Ed Moore, owner of The 3rd Corner Wine Shop and Bistro in Ocean Beach and Encinitas. “If I got a PPP loan today and brought all my people back, they would make less money. They would not be happy with me. But I would have fulfilled my obligation” for loan forgiveness.

As a trimmed down take-out restaurant and wine shop, The 3rd Corner is profitable, said Moore. He’s informally communicating with laid-off workers, navigating how to add an employee here and there without putting people “in a hard box” where they have to choose between unemployment benefits and returning to work.

The $600 Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation payment alone is equivalent to having a full-time job that pays $15 an hour. On top of that, laid-off workers can receive additional money from California unemployment insurance.

So far, however, it does not appear that a widespread number of furloughed San Diegans are choosing to stay on unemployment when given the chance to return to their jobs.

RELATED: The U-T’s Econometer panel considers if better unemployment benefits hurt efforts to reopen the economy.

Alex Shahabe, owner of PC Housing, began rehiring about 20 laid-off employees after receiving the PPP loan through Axos Bank. His company provides temporary housing to corporate workers and military personnel on short-term assignments across the globe.

“We had a couple people say: Wait a minute, I am making more being unemployed,” Shahabe said. “The conversation we had was do you want a secure job and for us to figure out how to move forward, or would you rather be on unemployment, and how long will that last?”

In the end, his workers decided to return. But Shahabe delayed the start date for a few workers “so they can take advantage of it for a couple weeks before they come back. And that’s fine. If it works for us, it’s OK,” he said.

Robert Rauch, a co-owner of three hotels in San Diego and others outside the region, was asked at a Rotary event last week if he thought employees would return to work given the enhanced unemployment benefits that the government is paying out.

“To be honest, if their preference is to stay on unemployment, I don’t want them anyway,” he said. “I am sorry if anyone takes offense.”

Rauch has begun reaching out to rehire laid-off workers last week after getting PPP loans for some hotel properties. He expects workers will want to return.

“What I did was go the leaders in each department and ask do they want to come back?” said Rauch. “They said, oh yes, they want to come back. It is not scientific, but I know my staff.”

Economic impact

An analysis by the EconoFact publication from The Fletcher School at Tufts University in Massachusetts argued the extra money violates the moral hazard principle, meaning it provides full — or more — money and creates an incentive to not look for employment.

Federal benefits go much further in states with weaker benefit programs, EconoFact said. For example, Mississippi’s rate tops out at $235 a week compared to California’s $450 and Washington state’s $790 a week.

The report also argued that unemployment was so generous that low-wage workers who continue to work should be paid more because of the “inequities they now face.” It argued higher risk jobs, such as coal mining, can pay more than one might expect given low educational requirements. However, it said it could be argued working at a grocery store is now a high-risk occupation.

The state Employment Development Department has processed 3.2 million claims for jobless benefits in the last month, an unprecedented number. San Diego County’s jobless rate is forecast at 24.7 percent, according to the San Diego Association of Governments, or SANDAG. The agency estimates one in four San Diegans, or about 430,000 people, are unemployed.

SANDAG, found the highest unemployment numbers were concentrated in some of San Diego’s least affluent areas: National City, Golden Hill, City Heights and San Ysidro.

Alan Gin, economist at University of San Diego, said a better way to think of it is workers making more money on unemployment are providing stimulus for a struggling economy. He said the jobless earning more tend to be on the low end of the pay scale anyway, and they will have the biggest struggles getting employment when things start reopening.

“All the money will likely be spent, even if just to pay bills, including rent or housing payments, which would stimulate the economy,” he said.

Calculating your unemployment

If you are an essential worker wondering what you might make on unemployment, or have lost your job and are waiting to file, the state Employment Development Department has an online benefits calculator at https://www.edd.ca.gov/unemployment/UI-Calculator.htm.

The first step is calculating what you made for each month in 2019. so it helps to have payslips on hand. It is important to enter wages you earned before taxes or other withholdings. After that, the website will give you your estimated weekly benefit. The highest it can go in California is $450 a week.

From there, add on the extra $600 a week to figure out what your benefits will be for the next few months.

Источник: https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/economy/story/2020-05-03/some-san-diegans-can-earn-more-on-unemployment-why-go-back-to-work

Unemployment Benefits

If your employer has reduced your hours or shut down operations due to COVID-19, you can file an unemployment claim by phone or mail with the State of California. The Governor’s Executive Order waives the one-week unpaid waiting period to file for people who are unemployed and/or disabled because of COVID-19.

For more information about Unemployment Insurance and COVID-19, visit these links:

Sick Leave

For information, contact your employer and visit https://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/2019-Novel-Coronavirus.htm.

State Disability Insurance or Paid Family Leave

Disability insurance and Paid Family Leave are part of the State Disability Insurance (SDI) program. If a medical professional has certified that you can’t work because you have, or have been exposed to, COVID-19, you can file a claim for State Disability Insurance. If you can’t work because you are caring for an eligible relative who is sick or quarantined by COVID-19, you can file for Paid Family Leave. For more on State Disability Insurance, paid family leave and unemployment, see https://edd.ca.gov/about_edd/coronavirus-2019/faqs.htm.

Sick or Quarantined

If you’re unable to work due to having or being exposed to COVID-19 (as certified by a medical professional), you can file a Disability Insurance (DI) claim. DI provides short-term benefit payments to eligible workers who have a full or partial loss of wages due to a non-work-related illness, injury, or pregnancy. Benefit amounts are approximately 60-70 percent of wages (depending on income) and range from $50-$1,300 a week.

Telehealth or other virtual medical appointments are acceptable methods of completing a physical examination and obtaining the required medical certification.

The Governor’s Executive Order waives the one-week unpaid waiting period, so you can collect DI benefits for the first week you are out of work. If you are eligible, the EDD processes and issues payments within a few weeks of receiving a claim.

Caregiving

If you’re unable to work because you are caring for an ill or quarantined family member with COVID-19 (as certified by a medical professional), you can file a Paid Family Leave (PFL) claim. PFL provides up to six weeks of benefit payments to eligible workers who have a full or partial loss of wages because they need time off work to care for a seriously ill family member or to bond with a new child. Benefit amounts are approximately 60-70 percent of wages (depending on income) and range from $50-$1,300 a week. If you are eligible, the EDD processes and issues payments within a few weeks of receiving a claim.

Telehealth or other virtual medical appointments are acceptable methods of completing a physical examination and obtaining the required medical certification.

School Closures

If your child's school is closed and you are unable to work while caring for them, you may be eligible for Unemployment Insurance benefits. Eligibility considerations include if you have no other care options and if you are unable to continue working your normal hours remotely. File an Unemployment Insurance claim and state EDD representatives will determine if you are eligible.

Reduced Work Hours

If your employer has reduced your hours or shut down operations due to COVID-19, you can file an Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim. UI provides partial wage replacement benefit payments to workers who lose their job or have their hours reduced through no fault of their own. If you are temporarily unemployed due to COVID-19 and expected to return to work with your employer within a few weeks, you are not required to actively seek work each week. However, you must remain able, available and ready to work during your unemployment for each week of benefits you claim as well as meet all other eligibility criteria. If you’re eligible, benefits can range from $40-$450 per week.

The Governor’s Executive Order waives the one-week unpaid waiting period, so you can collect UI benefits for the first week you are out of work. If you are eligible, the EDD processes and issues payments within a few weeks of receiving a claim.

Источник: https://covid19info.ocgov.com/employees

Federal Stimulus Tax Relief Payments

The IRS will automatically issue Economic Impact payments to those who are eligible, but if you want to check the status, visit: https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus-tax-relief-and-economic-impact-payments

California Unemployment Resources

For the latest on the state’s COVID-19 preparedness and response, visit cdph.ca.gov

Coronavirus EDD information: https://www.edd.ca.gov/about_edd/coronavirus-2019.htm

Apply for disability:
https://www.edd.ca.gov/Disability/How_to_File_a_DI_Claim_in_SDI_Online.htm

Apply for unemployment:
https://www.edd.ca.gov/Unemployment/Filing_a_Claim.htm

Unemployment Insurance – After You File:
https://www.edd.ca.gov/Unemployment/After_You_Filed.htm

EDD Training Benefits:
https://www.edd.ca.gov/Unemployment/California_Training_Benefits.htm

Texas Unemployment Resources

Unemployment Benefits & Employment Resources:

Texas Workforce Commission: www.twc.texas.gov

Texas Health & Human Services COVID-19 Updates: www.dshs.state.tx.us/coronavirus

Job Search Resources

Indeed Job Search: www.indeed.com
Zip Recruiter Job Search: www.ziprecruiter.com
Cal Careers Job Search: www.calcareers.ca.gov

Companies Currently Hiring

• Costco: www.Costco.com/jobs
• Amazon: www.amazondelivers.jobs
• Walmart: www.careers.walmart.com
• Target: https://corporate.target.com/careers/

Источник: https://hthf.org/what-we-do/pathways/employment-resources/

: Https www edd ca gov unemployment eligibility htm

Td bank routing number monticello ny
METRO PCS PAY BILL CUSTOMER SERVICE
At home hiv std test
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK BRANCHES IN USA
HOW DO I FIND MY ROUTING NUMBER PEOPLES UNITED BANK

Related Videos

California Unemployment Insurance

Https www edd ca gov unemployment eligibility htm -


We have seen containment efforts for COVID-19 continue to expand. Employers are facing governmental closures of businesses. The impact of COVID-19 is having an unprecedented impact on employers and employees with school closures, reduction in work hours, or elimination of jobs. In an effort to mitigate the impact of the pandemic, employers and employees will have to work together. Currently, the State and Federal Government have several programs to provide assistance.
 
EMPLOYER RESOURCES:
 
California Unemployment Insurance Work Sharing Program
 
As an alternative to layoff, California employers may participate in the California Employment Development Department's ("EDD") Work Sharing Program. If eligible, employees will receive up to 60% of their weekly unemployment benefits, based on how much their wages have been reduced. In order to participate in the Program, at least 10% of the employer's workforce must be affected by a reduction in hours and wages. The reduction in hours/wages cannot exceed 60%. An employer cannot discriminate with regard to health or retirement benefits being offered to employees on the Program.   Temporary or seasonal employees cannot participate in the Program and only regular full- or part-time employees may receive the benefits. The Program lasts for 12 months but employers may apply to renew or cancel it earlier if circumstances change. Additional information about the EDD's Work Sharing Program may be found here: https://www.edd.ca.gov/Unemployment/Work_Sharing_Program.htm 
  
Payroll Tax Deadline Extension
 
Employers impacted by COVID-19 may apply for a hardship requesting up to a 60-day extension of time to file their payroll taxes without penalty or interest. This extension may be granted under Section 1111.5 of the California Unemployment Insurance Code (CUIC). The EDD requires that the request be received by the EDD within 60 days of the original delinquency date. The following link provides additional information about the EDD payroll extension: https://www.edd.ca.gov/Payroll_Taxes/emergency_and_disaster_assistance_for_employers.htm 
  
Small Business Loans:
 
Employers that are impacted by COVID-19 may qualify for a Small Business Administration ("SBA") loan. The SBA is offering low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of COVID-19. SBA's Economic Injury Disaster Loans offer up to $2 million in assistance for a small business. These loans can provide vital economic support to small businesses to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing. The loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can't be paid because of the disaster's impact. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses without credit available elsewhere; businesses with credit available elsewhere are not eligible. The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75%. SBA offers loans with long-term repayments in order to keep payments affordable, up to a maximum of 30 years. Terms are determined on a case-by-case basis, based upon each borrower's ability to repay.
Link to SBA Loan Information: https://www.sba.gov/about-sba/sba-newsroom/press-releases-media-advisories/sba-provide-disaster-assistance-loans-small-businesses-impacted-coronavirus-covid-19 
  
EMPLOYEE RESOURCES
 
On March 4, 2020, Gavin Newsom signed executive Order N-26-20, to provide assistance to workers:

If you're unable to work because you are caring for an ill or quarantined family member you may qualify for Paid Family Leave (PFL).
If you're unable to work due to medical quarantine or illness, you may qualify for State Disability Insurance.
Those who have lost a job or have had their hours reduced for reasons related to COVID-19 may be able to partially recover their wages by filing an unemployment insurance claim.
If a worker or a family member is sick or for preventative care when civil authorities recommend quarantine, workers may use accrued paid sick leave in accordance with the law.
If workers are unable to perform their usual job because they were exposed to and contracted the virus during the regular course of their work, they may be eligible for workers' compensation benefits.

Employer Best Practices for COVID-19 and What's to Come
 
*           Permit remote work where job duties allow and encourage employees to use telephone and video conferencing instead of face-to-face meetings. Make certain that IT support is easily accessible.
 
*           Review the EDD's Work Sharing Program as an alternative to layoffs.
 
*           Be mindful of the tension between preventing the spread of COVID-19 and protecting your employee's privacy under the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act and related state law. The ADA prohibits an employer from making disability-related inquiries and requiring medical examinations of employees, except under limited circumstances. During a pandemic, you may send employees home if they display COVID-19-like symptoms. Speak with counsel before taking the temperature of your employees, however. You must maintain the confidentiality of any employee with confirmed COVID-19.
 
*           Review your Telecommuting Policy and if none, create one. Non-exempt employees who work remotely should be reminded to take all meal and rest breaks as if they were working onsite, and that they must record and report all time worked accurately.
 
*           Review your sick leave and vacation policies so that you are prepared to respond to employee questions about time off. Many schools have cancelled classes, so in addition to paid time off, parents, guardians and grandparents and others may be entitled to up to 40 hours of unpaid School and Child Care Activities Leave if you have 25 or more employees. School closures trigger this obligation, although you can require employees to use existing vacation, paid time off or other personal leave first. The CDC's guidance to employers suggests that you do not require a doctor's note for employees who are sick with acute respiratory illness because healthcare providers are extremely busy and are not able to provide documentation in a timely manner.
 
This Article is one of a series of Articles Ferruzzo & Ferruzzo, LLP will be circulating to address questions from clients related to COVID-19. Ferruzzo & Ferruzzo, LLP has formed a task force to assist business owners with their needs related to COVID-19.

 

 

Written by Timothy J McElfish. Esq.  and and Colleen M. McCarthy, Esq

 

    

Colleen M. McCarthy, Esq. is a Partner and chairs the Firm’s Employment Practices Group. She has dedicated her practice to representing and protecting employers, with a particular emphasis on risk mitigation through preventative counseling and   sound practical advice. For 15 years, Ms. McCarthy has counseled employers about the complicated employment laws that impact their businesses to ensure that they are in compliance, and to reduce the chance of costly litigation.
 

 

 

 

 

   .

Timothy J McElfish


Timothy J McElfish, Esq. is a Partner and chairs the Firm's Corporate and Real Estate Practice Group. His practice group dedicates itself to representing business owners and entrepreneurs. Mr. McElfish also handles all aspects of Corporate Governance, Mergers and Acquisitions, Real Estate Acquisitions and Dispositions, and Business Succession Planning.

Источник: http://www.ferruzzo.com/?/blog/employer-and-employee-options-covid-19